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Your dreams. Our mission.

Keynote Speaker: Jeffrey Duncan-Andrade

Jeff Dunkan-Andrade KeynoteAssociate Professor of Raza Studies and Education Administration and Interdisciplinary Studies and Director of the Educational Equity Initiative at the Wangari Maathai Institute for Sustainable Cities and Schools at San Francisco State University.  

 

 In addition to these duties, he continues as a high school teacher in East Oakland where for the past 18 years he has practiced and studied the use of critical pedagogy in urban schools. He currently teaches English at Mandela High School in East Oakland where he directs the East Oakland Step to College Program. Before joining the faculty at SFSU, Duncan-Andrade taught English and coached in the Oakland public schools for 10 years, and completed his doctoral studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Duncan-Andrade has lectured around the world about the elements of effective teaching in schools serving poor and working class children. He works closely with teachers, school site leaders, and school district officials nationally, and as far abroad as Brazil and New Zealand, to help them develop classroom practices and school cultures that foster self-confidence, esteem, and academic success among all students.

 

His research interests and publications span the areas of urban schooling and curriculum change, urban teacher development and retention, critical pedagogy, and cultural and ethnic studies. He has authored numerous journal articles and book chapters on the conditions of urban education, urban teacher support and development, and effective pedagogy in urban settings that have been published in leading journals such as Harvard Educational Review and Qualitative Studies in Education. He recently completed two books, The Art of Critical Pedagogy: Possibilities for Moving from Theory to Practice in Urban Schools and What a Coach Can Teach a Teacher, with Peter Lang Publishing. These books focus on effective pedagogical strategies for urban schools. He is currently completing his third book on the core competencies of highly effective urban educators with Routledge Press.



Note to Educators: Hope Required When Growing Roses in Concrete

What are the material conditions that effect urban youth before they even step foot in our schools? What does it mean to develop educational environments that are relevant and responsive to these conditions? How should these educational spaces define success for students and educators?

This talk focuses on developing educators that are better equipped to create educational environments that understand and respond to the social toxins that emerge from inequality. The talk closely examines the types of social toxins that young people face in the broader society and discusses the impact of these conditions on student identities. Inside of this framing, Duncan-Andrade draws from his 18 years as an urban educator to explore the concept of hope, as essential for nurturing urban youth. He identifies three forms of “false hope”—hokey hope, mythical hope, and hope deferred—pervasive in and peddled by many urban schools. These false hopes give way to Duncan-Andrade’s conception of “critical hope,” explained through the description of three necessary elements of educational practice that produce and sustain hope and transformation. Through the voices of young people and their teachers, and the invocation of powerful metaphor and imagery, Duncan-Andrade proclaims critical hope’s significance for an education that relieves undeserved suffering in communities.